Lead

Source:  Lead    Tag:  lead glass shielding
Lead is a very corrosion-resistant, dense, ductile, and malleable blue-gray metal that has been used for at least 5,000 years. Early uses of Lead included building materials, pigments for glazing ceramics, and pipes for transporting water. The castles and cathedrals of Europe contain considerable quantities ofLead in decorative fixtures, roofs, pipes, and windows. Prior to the early 1900s, uses of Lead in the United States were primarily for ammunition, brass, burial vault liners, ceramic glazes, Leaded glass and crystal, paints or other protective coatings, pewter, and water lines and pipes. With the growth in production of public and private motorized vehicles and the associated use of starting-lighting-ignition (SLI) Lead-acid storage batteries and terne metal for gas tanks after World War I, demand for Lead increased. Most of these uses for Lead continued to increase with the growth in population and the national economy. Contributing to the increase in demand for Lead was the use of Lead as radiation shielding in medical analysis and video display equipment and as an additive in gasoline. In Iran, Lead has known since 3rd millennium before Christ. Nowadays Iran has ma ny large mines of Lead such as Angooran, Nakhlak, etc. So Iran is one of the biggest Lead Suppliers in Middle East. Marjan Mineral Company has a great trading communication with most of Lead mines, and can provide all necessary things for exporting their products. Read more . . .



Different types of Lead Ores
The abundance of Lead in the Earth's crust is estimated to be between 13 and 20 parts per million. It ranks in the upper third among the elements in terms of its abundance. The more important Lead minerals are:
  • Galena (PbS, 86% Pb)
  • Anglesite (PbSO4, 68% Pb)
  • Cerussite (PbCO3, 77% Pb)


Lead Usages:
Prior to the early 1900s, Lead was used in the United States primarily in ammunition, burial vault liners, ceramic glazes, Leaded glass and crystal, paints or other protective coatings, pewter, and water lines and pipes. Following World War I, the demand for Lead increased because of growth in the production of motorized vehicles, many of which use Lead-acid batteries to start their engines. The use of Lead as radiation shielding in medical analysis and video display equipment and as an additive in gasoline also contributed to an increase in the demand for Lead.  Read more . . .