Winter Season - Week 7

Source:  Winter Season - Week 7    Tag:  radioactive lsa





"Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast."


~Lewis Carroll



Fundraising Tip

Send a Postcard Reminder to those who haven't donated yet. Be sure to update your list at this time as you may have realized someone you forgot earlier or you may have recently met someone new.



Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT ARE SOME NEW APPROACHES TO TREATMENT?
• Monoclonal Antibodies- The treatment fuses radioactive iodine to a monoclonal antibody. These antibodies are used as guided missiles to target and destroy malignant cells in leukemia patients. Since the antibody attaches to specific sites on the surface of the cancerous white blood cells but not to normal tissues, it focuses the radiation effect on the leukemia cells.

• Blood Cell Growth Factors-These are naturally occurring body proteins that help regulate the number of blood cells in circulation. These factors can be genetically engineered into drugs and used to treat acute leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma.

• Umbilical Cord Blood- Transplant specialists use blood from the umbilical cord and placenta of newborns to replace the diseased marrow of children with leukemia who no longer responded to conventional methods of treatment. Umbilical cord blood is an excellent source of stem cells (also present in marrow) that can reconstitute a healthy blood cell population. LSA researchers were among the first in the nation to perform cord blood transplants from unrelated donors.

• New Drugs-Leukemia & Lymphoma Society researchers are evaluating drugs in development and novel drug combinations as the foundation for more promising new treatments. The use of purine nucleotides such as 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA), is under investigation for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia.


Mission Moment
In Memory Of Luz E. Burgos
New York, NY
United States
female
Lived with Leukemia - rare type for 2 months

My mother was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia on Mother's Day of 2006, at the age of 62. Unfortunately, she died two months later. She chose to spend the rest of her days at Zicklin Hospice in NYC. They made her last days absolutely wonderful. Until the day she passed she had a smile on her face because of all the support she received. Please, please, if your loved one chooses this path, please support them and enjoy the time they have left. My mother was an amazing woman full of life, love and happiness. She lived and died that way.